Research Reports - Depression in youth recovering from concussion

Brain Inj. 2017 Mar 22:1-8. doi: 10.1080/02699052.2017.1283533. [Epub ahead of
print]

Stazyk K(1,)(2), DeMatteo C(1,)(2), Moll S(1), Missiuna C(1,)(2).

OBJECTIVES: Although depression can be a serious consequence of concussion,
little is known about the factors that predict depression and concussion recovery
outcomes in children. The purpose of this study was to explore the risk and
possible predictors of developing significant depressive symptoms in children
recovering from concussion.
METHODS: A prospective cohort study was conducted in a paediatric tertiary care
clinic. Depression data were collected from 92 children using the Children's
Depression Inventory-2 (CDI-2) screening tool. Correlations, t-tests and logistic
regression were used to examine the associations between depression scores and
demographic as well as injury-related factors.
RESULTS: Depressive symptoms were found in 22% of the children (T score on CDI-2
>65). Children with evidence of depressive symptomatology had significantly
higher mean post-concussive symptom inventory (PCSI) scores in recovery (p =
0.004) than children who were not depressed. Variables of i) Sex; ii) hospital
admission; iii) number of head injuries; iv) post-concussion symptom score and v)
experience of prolonged symptoms were predictive of clinically significant CDI T
scores, explaining 36% of the variation in the binary logistic model.
CONCLUSION: Depression is commonly reported in this subset of children. High
post-concussive symptom scores and hospital admission were strong predictors of
depression. Screening for depression should be standard practice in concussion
management in children and youth. 

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