Research Reports - Remediation of social communication impairments following traumatic brain injury using metacognitive strategy intervention

Brain Inj. 2017 Jul 27:1-10. doi: 10.1080/02699052.2017.1346284. [Epub ahead of
print]

Finch E(1)(2)(3), Cornwell P(4)(5)(6), Copley A(1), Doig E(1)(3), Fleming
J(1)(3)(7).

OBJECTIVE: To perform a pilot study to evaluate whether a novel metacognitive,
goal-based intervention improved and maintained the social communication skills
of adults with traumatic brain injury (TBI).
METHOD: Eight community-dwelling participants with TBI completed three study
phases: (1) baseline, (2) eight-week intervention targeting social communication
impairments and (3) follow-up. Participants completed the Profile of Pragmatic
Impairment in Communication (PPIC), LaTrobe Communication Questionnaire (LCQ) and
Goal Attainment Scaling (GAS) at the commencement of baseline phase, pre- and
post-intervention and completion of the follow-up phase. During the intervention
programme phase, participants attended two 1-hour therapy sessions (one
individual; one group) per week focusing on remediating impaired social
communication skills using metacognitive strategy intervention and goal-based
therapy.
RESULTS: Variable changes in PPIC feature-summary scores were observed
post-intervention. A non-significant improvement in LCQ scores was also observed.
There was a significant increase in GAS goal T-scores following the intervention,
with six of the eight participants achieving or exceeding their expected level of
performance on all goals.
CONCLUSION: A goal-driven, metacognitive approach to intervention may assist
individuals with TBI to achieve their personal social communication goals, with
benefits reported by participants and observable during conversations. Further
research is required.
 

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