Research Reports - Early metabolic crisis-related brain atrophy and cognition in traumatic brain injury

Brain Imaging Behav. 2013 May 1

Wright MJ, McArthur DL, Alger JR, Van Horn J, Irimia A, Filippou M, Glenn TC, Hovda DA, Vespa P

Traumatic brain injury often results in acute metabolic crisis. We recently
demonstrated that this is associated with chronic brain atrophy, which is most
prominent in the frontal and temporal lobes. Interestingly, the
neuropsychological profile of traumatic brain injury is often characterized as
'frontal-temporal' in nature, suggesting a possible link between acute metabolic
crisis-related brain atrophy and neurocognitive impairment in this population.
While focal lesions and diffuse axonal injury have a well-established role in the
neuropsychological deficits observed following traumatic brain injury, no studies
to date have examined the possible contribution of acute metabolic crisis-related
atrophy in the neuropsychological sequelae of traumatic brain injury. In the
current study we employed positron emission tomography, magnetic resonance
imaging, and neuropsychological assessments to ascertain the relationship between
acute metabolic crisis-related brain atrophy and neurocognitive outcome in a
sample of 14 right-handed traumatic brain injury survivors. We found that acute
metabolic crisis-related atrophy in the frontal and temporal lobes was associated
with poorer attention, executive functioning, and psychomotor abilities at
12 months post-injury. Furthermore, participants with gross frontal and/or
temporal lobe atrophy exhibited numerous clinically significant
neuropsychological deficits in contrast to participants with other patterns of
brain atrophy. Our findings suggest that interventions that reduce acute
metabolic crisis may lead to improved functional outcomes for traumatic brain
injury survivors.

« Back to Special Reports

Contact Us

We will gladly answer all or your questions about rehabilitation at Centre for Neuro Skills.

email cns@neuroskills.com

phone 1.800.922.4994
or Request a Callback


brain injury store


free brain injury newsletter


why choose cns for brain injury rehabilitation


brain injury newsletter


brain injury store