Research Reports - Subjective impact of traumatic brain injury on long-term outcome at a minimum of 10 years after trauma

Patient Saf Surg. 2013 Oct 10;7(1):32

Andruszkow H, Urner J, Deniz E, Probst C, Grün O, Lohse R, Frink M, Hildebrand F, Zeckey C

BACKGROUND: Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) may lead to significant impairments in
personal, social and professional life. However, knowledge of the influence on
long-term outcome after TBI is sparse. We therefore aimed to investigate the
subjective effects of TBI on long-term outcome at a minimum of 10 years after
trauma in one of the largest study populations in Germany.
METHODS: The current investigation represents a retrospective cohort study at a
level I trauma center including physical examination or standardized
questionnaires of patients with mild, moderate or severe isolated TBI with a
minimum follow-up of 10 years. We investigated the subjective physical,
psychological and social outcome evaluating the Glasgow Outcome Scale, short-form
12, and social as well as vocational living circumstances.
RESULTS: 368 patients aged 0 to 88 years were included. Patients with severe TBI
were younger compared to patients with moderate or mild TBI (p < 0.05). Patients
with severe TBI lived more often as single after the trauma impact. A
significantly worse outcome was associated with higher severity of TBI resulting
in an increased incidence of mental disability. A professional decline was
analyzed in case of severe TBI resulting in significant loss of salary.
CONCLUSIONS: The severity of TBI significantly influenced the subjective social
and living conditions. Subjective mental and physical outcome as well as
professional life depended on the severity of TBI 10 years after the injury.

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